Additional Treatments

St. Louis Hemorrhoid Centers would like to be your partner in health care. Feel free to ask your questions and share your concerns with us. We will work with you to develop a wellness program for the care and treatment you need.

We welcome you to our practice and look forward to caring for you.

St. Louis Hemorrhoid Centers provides a full range of medical services including the following:

 

Anoscopy

An anoscopy is a diagnostic procedure performed to examine the inner lining of the anus, the anal canal, and the rectum. The rectum is the lowest portion of the large intestine and the anus is the opening through which waste is evacuated. The anal canal is the channel that connects them. During an anoscopy, a small tube, called an anoscope, is inserted in the anus and into the rectum to detect abnormalities in the region, including hemorrhoids and benign or malignant polyps or tumors. ...


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Anal Pain

 

 

Anal pain, or pain in the perianal region (the area around the anus or rectum), is a common complaint with a number of different causes. Although the causes of anal pain are often benign, the pain itself can be severe because of the many nerve endings in the area. If anal pain is associated with rectal bleeding, fever, or anal discharge, it is more likely to be serious and a physician should be consulted promptly. ...


Read More...

 

 

Anal Fissure

 

 

An anal fissure is a tear in the mucous membrane that lines the anus and the anal canal. This condition often leads to pain, itching, burning and bleeding during bowel movements, as well as as to a visible crack in the skin around the anus. Anal fissures are relatively common in young infants, but can occur in patients of all ages. While most anal fissures heal on their own within 4 to 6 weeks, some require surgery. ...


Read More...

 

 

Pilonidal Cyst Removal

 

 

A pilonidal cyst is a fluid-filled, pimple-like sac at the coccyx (tailbone), just below the crack of the buttocks. Pilonidal cysts are prone to infection; if one does become infected, filling with pus, it is technically called a "pilonidal abscess." Pilonidal abscesses are always treated with excision and drainage because, left untreated, the infection can spread. ...


Read More...

 

 

Hemorrhoids FAQs

 

 

Hemorrhoids are swollen, inflamed veins in the anal canal (internal hemorrhoids) or under the skin around the anus (external hemorrhoids). In their normal state, these veins provide cushioning during bowel movements. They can, however, swell from lifting, straining, being constipated, passing hard stools and having diarrhea, or from pregnancy. Hemorrhoids are not usually serious, but they can be painful and interfere with quality of life. If swelling persists, the veins may become permanently stretched (prolapsed). Hemorrhoids are a very common complaint, particularly in people older than 50. Fortunately, there are many treatment options available. ...


Read More...

 

 

Hemorrhoids

 

 

 

Hemorrhoids are swollen veins in the anal canal. In their normal state, these veins provide cushioning during bowel movements. They can, however, swell from lifting, straining, being constipated, passing hard stools and having diarrhea, or from pregnancy. Hemorrhoids are not life-threatening, but they can be painful. If swelling persists, the veins may become permanently stretched (prolapsed). ...


Read More...

 

 

Diverticulitis

 

 

Diverticulitis is the inflammation of the diverticula, small pouches found in the inner lining of the intestinal tract. Diverticulosis, the condition that causes the pouches to form, is common in people age 40 and older. Nearly half the people in the United States develop diverticulosis by the age of 60. Diverticula, which are multiple small pouches, can occur anywhere along the digestive tract, but are most commonly found in the lower portion of the large intestine, the sigmoid colon. Most often, these pouches are not troublesome, but when they become infected and inflamed, the resulting condition is known as diverticulitis. ...


Read More...

 

 

Colorectal Cancer

 

 

Colorectal cancer, also known as colon cancer, develops in the large intestine or the rectum. Cancer occurs when healthy cells become altered, growing and dividing in a way that keeps the body from functioning normally. Most cases of colorectal cancer begin as small, benign clusters of cells (polyps) on the lining of the colon or rectum. Certain types of polyps, called adenomas, can become malignant. ...


Read More...

 

 

Colon Resection

 

 

A colon resection, or colectomy, is a surgical procedure to remove either part, or all, of the large intestine (colon). This procedure is performed to repair a congenital abnormality or damage caused by a disease condition, a traumatic injury or a severe infection. A colon resection may be performed as an open procedure or laparoscopically. Wherever possible, the laparoscopic procedure is preferred since it results in smaller incisions, fewer complications, and a shorter recovery period. Normally, during a colon resection, after the diseased portions of the colon are removed, the healthy ends of the colon are reattached to one another with sutures. In more serious cases, however, a colostomy may be necessary, either temporarily or permanently. ...


Read More...

 

 

Cholecystectomy FAQs

 

 

 

What is a cholecystectomy?

 

A cholecystectomy is a surgical removal of the gallbladder, a small organ located under the liver.

When is a cholecystectomy required?

A cholecystectomy is usually performed when the gallbladder is inflamed, blocked, diseased, cancerous or contains gallstones. ...


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Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

 

 

Cholecystectomy is the surgical removal of the gallbladder, a small organ located under the liver. The gallbladder collects and releases bile to aid in the process of digestion. Although the gallbladder performs a digestive function, it is not necessary for proper body functioning and may be removed if diseased. ...


Read More...


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Anoscopy

An anoscopy is a diagnostic procedure performed to examine the inner lining of the anus, the anal canal, and the rectum. The rectum is the lowest portion of the large intestine and the anus is the opening through which waste is evacuated. The anal canal is the channel that connects them. During an anoscopy, a small tube, called an anoscope, is inserted in the anus and into the rectum to detect abnormalities in the region, including hemorrhoids and benign or malignant polyps or tumors. ...


Read More...

Anal Pain

Anal pain, or pain in the perianal region (the area around the anus or rectum), is a common complaint with a number of different causes. Although the causes of anal pain are often benign, the pain itself can be severe because of the many nerve endings in the area. If anal pain is associated with rectal bleeding, fever, or anal discharge, it is more likely to be serious and a physician should be consulted promptly. ...


Read More...

Anal Fissure

An anal fissure is a tear in the mucous membrane that lines the anus and the anal canal. This condition often leads to pain, itching, burning and bleeding during bowel movements, as well as as to a visible crack in the skin around the anus. Anal fissures are relatively common in young infants, but can occur in patients of all ages. While most anal fissures heal on their own within 4 to 6 weeks, some require surgery. ...


Read More...

Infrared Coagulation

Hemorrhoids are swollen veins in the anal canal. These veins can cause pain and discomfort that can become severe. Infrared coagulation (IRC) is a non-surgical, minimally invasive treatment for hemorrhoids, that is very effective for many patients. During the IRC procedure, the hemorrhoid is exposed to a warm, painless infrared light or electrical current. Hemorrhoids can be successfully treated during a series of IRC sessions. ...


Read More...

Pilonidal Cyst Removal

A pilonidal cyst is a fluid-filled, pimple-like sac at the coccyx (tailbone), just below the crack of the buttocks. Pilonidal cysts are prone to infection; if one does become infected, filling with pus, it is technically called a "pilonidal abscess." Pilonidal abscesses are always treated with excision and drainage because, left untreated, the infection can spread. ...


Read More...

Hemorrhoids FAQs

Hemorrhoids are swollen, inflamed veins in the anal canal (internal hemorrhoids) or under the skin around the anus (external hemorrhoids). In their normal state, these veins provide cushioning during bowel movements. They can, however, swell from lifting, straining, being constipated, passing hard stools and having diarrhea, or from pregnancy. Hemorrhoids are not usually serious, but they can be painful and interfere with quality of life. If swelling persists, the veins may become permanently stretched (prolapsed). Hemorrhoids are a very common complaint, particularly in people older than 50. Fortunately, there are many treatment options available. ...


Read More...

Hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids are swollen veins in the anal canal. In their normal state, these veins provide cushioning during bowel movements. They can, however, swell from lifting, straining, being constipated, passing hard stools and having diarrhea, or from pregnancy. Hemorrhoids are not life-threatening, but they can be painful. If swelling persists, the veins may become permanently stretched (prolapsed). ...


Read More...

Diverticulitis

Diverticulitis is the inflammation of the diverticula, small pouches found in the inner lining of the intestinal tract. Diverticulosis, the condition that causes the pouches to form, is common in people age 40 and older. Nearly half the people in the United States develop diverticulosis by the age of 60. Diverticula, which are multiple small pouches, can occur anywhere along the digestive tract, but are most commonly found in the lower portion of the large intestine, the sigmoid colon. Most often, these pouches are not troublesome, but when they become infected and inflamed, the resulting condition is known as diverticulitis. ...


Read More...

Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer, also known as colon cancer, develops in the large intestine or the rectum. Cancer occurs when healthy cells become altered, growing and dividing in a way that keeps the body from functioning normally. Most cases of colorectal cancer begin as small, benign clusters of cells (polyps) on the lining of the colon or rectum. Certain types of polyps, called adenomas, can become malignant. ...


Read More...

Colon Resection

A colon resection, or colectomy, is a surgical procedure to remove either part, or all, of the large intestine (colon). This procedure is performed to repair a congenital abnormality or damage caused by a disease condition, a traumatic injury or a severe infection. A colon resection may be performed as an open procedure or laparoscopically. Wherever possible, the laparoscopic procedure is preferred since it results in smaller incisions, fewer complications, and a shorter recovery period. Normally, during a colon resection, after the diseased portions of the colon are removed, the healthy ends of the colon are reattached to one another with sutures. In more serious cases, however, a colostomy may be necessary, either temporarily or permanently. ...


Read More...

Cholecystectomy FAQs

What is a cholecystectomy?

A cholecystectomy is a surgical removal of the gallbladder, a small organ located under the liver. ...


Read More...

Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

Cholecystectomy is the surgical removal of the gallbladder, a small organ located under the liver. The gallbladder collects and releases bile to aid in the process of digestion. Although the gallbladder performs a digestive function, it is not necessary for proper body functioning and may be removed if diseased. ...


Read More...